Tuesday, October 04, 2011

Picasso en New York



Self-Portrait (Paris, late 1901- early 1902), black chalk with watercolor on paper, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection (1970.17.164) © 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York*
* Reproduction, including downloading of Pablo Picasso works is prohibited by copyright laws and international conventions without the express written permission of Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.






Fuente: http://www.frick.org/exhibitions/future.htm

4 octubre 2011 – 8 enero 2012
The Frick Collection, Nueva York
Exposición

Picasso's Drawings, 1890–1921: Reinventing Tradition


La Frick Collection de Nueva York y la National Gallery, Washington DC, exponen una selección de más de 50 de dibujos de Picasso, de los precoces ejercicios de su juventud en la década de 1890 a las de obras virtuoso clásico de la década de 1920. Las piezas proceden de importantes colecciones públicas y privadas de Europa y los Estados Unidos y la muestra va acompañada por un extenso catálogo sobre el tema.
Las comisarias son Susan Grace Galassi (The Frick Collection), y Marilyn McCully, experta en Picasso, en colaboración con Andrew Robinson, Mellon Senior Curator de grabados y dibujos (National Gallery of Washington).
Patrocinan la publicación del catálogo el Center for Spain in America (CSA) y The Christian Humann Foundation.
Los fondos para la exposición en Nueva York son aportados, entre otros, por Bill y Donna Acquavella, la Stavros Niarchos Foundation, y Melvin R. Seiden.



About the Exhibition
Pablo Picasso (1881–1973) is generally acknowledged to be the greatest draftsman of the twentieth century. The Frick Collection, New York, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., have co-organized an exhibition for 2011–12 that will look at the dazzling development of Picasso's drawings, from the precocious academic exercises of his youth in the 1890s to the virtuoso classical works of the early 1920s. Through a selection of more than fifty works at each venue, the presentation will examine the artist's stylistic experiments and techniques in this roughly thirty-year period, which begins and ends in a classical mode and encompasses the radical innovations of cubism and collage. The show (which opens at the Frick in the fall of 2011 and moves on to the National Gallery of Art in February 2012) will demonstrate how drawing served as an essential means of invention and discovery in Picasso's multifaceted art, while its centrality in his vast oeuvre connects him deeply with the grand tradition of European masters. Indeed, the exhibition will bring to the fore his complex engagement with artists of the near and distant past and will explore the diverse ways he competed with the virtuoso techniques of his predecessors and perpetuated them in revitalized form. Picasso's Drawings, 1890–1921: Reinventing Tradition features loans from important public and private collections in Europe and the United States and is accompanied by a full-color catalogue of the same name. It is being organized by Susan Grace Galassi, Senior Curator, The Frick Collection, and Marilyn McCully, Picasso expert, in conjunction with Andrew Robison, Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings at the National Gallery of Art. Comments Galassi, "Over the past decade several exhibitions organized both in the United States and abroad have explored Picasso's art in relation to Western and non-Western traditions. The show focuses on this fundamental aspect of his work, specifically in relation to his drawings, where his interaction with artists of the past often first emerged. Our project aims to take a fresh look at Picasso's drawing practice from his early training to maturity."
Major funding for the presentation in New York is provided by Bill and Donna Acquavella, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, and the late Melvin R. Seiden.
Additional support is generously provided by Walter and Vera Eberstadt, Agnes Gund, the Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation, the Thaw Charitable Trust, Mr. and Mrs. Julio Mario Santo Domingo, and the National Endowment for the Arts.
The exhibition is also supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.
The accompanying catalogue has been underwritten by the Center for Spain in America and The Christian Humann Foundation.

Fuente: http://www.frick.org/exhibitions/picasso/index.htm

Reinventing Tradition
Pablo Picasso (1881–1973) was one of the world's greatest draftsmen. This exhibition focuses on drawings made during the first three decades of his seventy-five-year career. Born in Málaga in southern Spain, Picasso was the son of a provincial artist and drawing instructor who encouraged his talents from an early age. By sixteen, he had mastered the conventions of classical draftsmanship through rigorous study in Spanish
academies and sheer hard work.
Picasso's early decades in Paris, where he moved permanently in 1904, coincided with a burgeoning modern movement. While he responded to the innovations of such artists as Ingres, Van Gogh, Cézanne, and Gauguin, he also had access to works on paper by Old Masters in large-scale museum installations and exhibitions — a relatively new phenomenon — and through new and improved means of reproduction, providing him with the finest examples of the tradition in which he was trained and sought to renew.
The sixty works in this exhibition include virtuoso portrait drawings, early and late cubist works, and powerful sculptural images in pastel. They trace the development of the artist from his childhood and student works, early encounters with modern art in Barcelona and Paris, creative interactions with ancient Iberian and tribal art, radical innovations of cubism and papiers collés (pasted papers), and a return to classicism after World War I. The array of works in pen, pencil, brush and ink, watercolor, gouache, pastel, and chalk gathered together here captures the freshness of Picasso's discoveries of the many Western and non-Western sources that nurtured his imagination and enabled him to claim a place in the grand tradition of drawing as one of its most extraordinarily accomplished practitioners.
Major funding for the presentation in New York is provided by Bill and Donna Acquavella, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, and the late Melvin R. Seiden.
Additional support is generously provided by Walter and Vera Eberstadt, Agnes Gund, the Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation, the Thaw Charitable Trust, Mr. and Mrs. Julio Mario Santo Domingo, and the National Endowment for the Arts.
The exhibition is also supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.
The accompanying catalogue has been underwritten by the Center for Spain in America and The Christian Humann Foundation.

Fuente: http://www.frick.org/exhibitions/picasso/reinventing.htm

Drawing in Fontainebleau and Paris, 1921
The summer months that Picasso spent in Fontainebleau in 1921 represented a period of enormous creativity for the artist, with the practice of drawing assuming a principal role. He focused on subjects with classical connotations, including a series of women in antique robes who are shown gathering at the Napoleon Fountain in the park of the palace. Picasso's choice of certain materials, including pastels, pencil, and charcoal, also reflects his response to the drawings that he was able to study in an exhibition at the château of works by members of the sixteenth-century "School of Fontainebleau." For his own compositions, he worked on different formats and experimented with classical notions of scale and monumentality.
Photographs of the Fontainebleau studio reveal that, in addition to several big paintings, Picasso did a number of large-format drawings of women's heads, including Head of a Woman (cat. 70 and the catalogue cover at right). Although these heads, which were done either in gouache or pastel, generally make reference in form to ancient sculpture and in color to Pompeian wall painting, the women portrayed also bear some resemblance to the artist's wife Olga.
On his return to Paris at the end of September, Picasso embarked on a related series of drawings of women gathered at an urban fountain. For the different variations, some of which were done on large sheets of paper, Picasso chose delicate pastels, gouache, charcoal, and pencil (cats. 71, 72, 74). These monumental women, who sometimes wear flowered hats and veils and are dressed in contemporary attire, are thus transformed into modern-day sisters of the classicizing women at the Fontainebleau fountain done just weeks earlier.
Major funding for the presentation in New York is provided by Bill and Donna Acquavella, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, and the late Melvin R. Seiden.
Additional support is generously provided by Walter and Vera Eberstadt, Agnes Gund, the Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation, the Thaw Charitable Trust, Mr. and Mrs. Julio Mario Santo Domingo, and the National Endowment for the Arts.
The exhibition is also supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.
The accompanying catalogue has been underwritten by the Center for Spain in America and The Christian Humann Foundation.

Fuente: http://www.frick.org/exhibitions/picasso/drawing.htm

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